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Help Your Infant Through Teething

Teething usually begins around 6 months of age. But it is normal for teething to start at any time between 3 months and 12 months of age. By the time your child is about 3 years old, he or she will have all 20 primary teeth.

What are the symptoms?

Some babies are fussier than usual when they are teething. This may be because of soreness and swelling in the gums before a tooth comes through. These symptoms usually begin about 3 to 5 days before the tooth shows, and they disappear as soon as the tooth breaks the skin. Many babies don’t seem to be affected by teething.

Babies may bite on their fingers or toys to help relieve the pressure in their gums. They may also refuse to eat and drink because their mouths hurt.

Many babies drool during teething, which can cause a rash on the chin, face, or chest.

Mild symptoms that get better usually are nothing to worry about. Call your doctor if your baby’s symptoms are severe or don’t get better.

How can you help your baby be more comfortable while teething?

Here are some tips to help your baby feel better while teething:

  • Use a clean finger (or cold teething ring) to gently rub your baby’s gum for about 2 minutes at a time. Many babies find this soothing, although they may protest at first.
  • Provide safe objects for your baby to chew on, such as teething rings.
  • If needed, give your baby an over-the-counter pain reliever that is labeled for his or her specific age. Read and follow all instructions.Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than 20, because it has been linked to Reye syndrome.

Here at Akeba Academy we have no problem dealing with a child who is going through the awful teething stage. We are use to it and know all the tricks to calm your baby and help soothe their pain. Bring your baby in for a visit today or call us at (912) 289-2725

Benefits Of Reading To Your Toddler

Reading to your toddler

When to expect it: Receptive language (the understanding that words have meaning) develops on a different timeline than expressive language (the ability to say words with meaning) — and your child is likely to understand words in books long before he can say most of them. Between 12 and 18 months of age, many toddlers demonstrate their growing word comprehension by pointing to the colors, animals, characters and objects in a book that they know the words for. Because many toddlers are also continuing to develop fine motor skills at this time, your toddler may particularly love books that have interactive elements, such as flaps, popups and buttons.

Read to your toddler often — it’s so important for many reasons. Toddlers are:

  • Little word processors. This is the age when children’s vocabularies blossimage1om. Reading reinforces their understanding of the new words they’re learning and the contexts they’re used in —
  • Ready to build their literary skills. Reading to a toddler sets the foundation for toddler learning, including mastering ABCs, developing phonemic awareness (meaning he’s starting to understand that words are made up of groups of sounds) and learning that those marks on a page represent letters and words (and things and concepts).
  • Better prepared for school with books. Although “real” school may seem light-years away, it’s just around the corner (and most kids are expected to start reading, at least on a rudimentary level, in kindergarten). Children who are introduced to reading early tend to read earlier themselves.
  • Apt to benefit from books about growing up. The road from babyhood to big kid can be bumpy between 1 to 3 or so not to mention the potential frustrations and fears he may encounter. Reading to a toddler can help you cover these subjects in ways your child can understand, as well as help him adjust to the brave new world he faces.

How to help your baby discover it: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends reading sessions from infancy on to prepare your child for lifelong success, since kids who are read to as babies have better language skills and are more interested in reading when they start school. Sharing a book also helps babies and parents bond, which the AAP notes is essential for a child’s cognitive and social-emotional development. So from an early age, read often to your little one, pointing out objects, characters, animals, colors, textures and sizes in the pictures he sees.

We know how important reading is and how much of an impact it has on the lives of young children. That’s why here at Akeba Academy our teachers read to the students every day. The pictures above are our Toddler One and Preschool class having story time.

 

Baby Showers

Tips for Planning an Over the Top Baby Shower

Baby showers are heartfelt, emotional events. To make it most happening, individuals plan plenty of ideas and make arrangements. It starts with choosing the finest outfit to classy decoration. It is not necessary to plan baby shower in a greatly traditional way. Therefore, many of them choose to celebrate in a stylish way. Today, baby showers can include nearly everything you want to add up. You can make it a Cocktail Party, Sunday Brunch or may be a Barbecue Dinner.

Here are few tips to follow before planning the best Baby baby-shower-cookies-190641_w650 blog Shower:

Firstly decide timings

Will it be in evening or afternoon that’s how you can decide what type of party it could be a dinner or lunch, evening time is always more suitable. At all times keep your guest of honor’s condition in mind when planning.

Location

The spot is an essential thing. You can host a baby shower anywhere you want. Plan a Restaurant Baby Shower, park, and beach or, of course, a home baby shower. A home is a supreme location for a baby shower. It’s private and comfortable— perfect for such a personal event.

Invitation

Select cool way to invite guests. Consider printed cards, handmade invites or electronic means of invitation.

Refreshment

No checklist is complete without something to eat and drink. Homemade cookies can make the perfect parting gift. Not to forget a perfect dinner later cake & dessert.

Tableware

Put tablecloth, napkins, etc., on your list. Don’t forget to enhance utensils (baby-shower-bloge.g., Bowl, serving trays, plates, cups, and glasses). It can be your choice either to put real dishes or paper plate.

Decorations

The decoration is desirable for baby shower event to make it eye catchy. Pick some flowers, balloons, candles, fancy table, striking lights and lovely air freshener.

Wrap up

Conclude your baby shower on an unforgettable note. Craft a memory book on hand for guests to write in. They can write advice or important thing they know about babies or best wishes in their heart.

Baby showers are always fun. Here at Akeba Academy Daycare and Party Center we know all the essential things needed to have a great party. If you and your child would like to be join us give us a call (912) 289-2725

Teaching Your Child To Share

Make sharing fun
Teach your child cooperative games in which players work together toward a common goal. Do puzzles together, taking turns adding pieces, for instance. Share projects, too: water the plants, sweep the floor, or unpack the shopping with him. Finally, give him things to share with his friends now and then, like a special snack for nursery or a roll of stickers to divvy up during playtime.

Don’t punish stinginess
If you tell your child that he’s selfish, discipline him when he doesn’t share, or force him to hand over a prized possession, you’ll foster resentment, not generosity. To encourage sharing, use positive reinforcement rather than admonishment. Keep in mind, too, that it’s OK for your child to hold back certain items. As he matures, he’ll learn that sharing with friends – who are becoming increasingly important to him – is more fun than keeping things to himself.

Talk it up
When children squabble over toys, help them work out what’s really going on. If a friend is holding something back, explain to your child how his playmate might be feeling. For instance: “Josh really likes that toy, and he doesn’t want anyone to play with it right now.” Help your preschooler put his own feelings into words too. When he’s not being especially generous, ask him what’s wrong. Maybe you’ll discover that there’s a shortage of train tracks at his nursery or that he especially prizes his football cards because they were a present from Grandad.

Teach your youngster to problem-solve
If your child has a death grip on a toy truck that his playmate wants, chances are he’s thinking, “It’s either him or me.” The concept of sharing the truck may not even have occurred to him. Encourage your child to take turns with the truck (setting a kitchen timer to mark each child’s turn may help), reassure him that sharing isn’t the same as giving away, and point out that if he shares his toys with friends, they’ll be more inclined to share theirs with him.

Set the stage Two children are playing on the floor
Before playtime, ask your child if there’s anything he’d rather not share, and help him find a good place to keep those special toys. Then ask him to think of some things that would be fun for him and his visitor to play with together, such as toy walkie-talkies, art and craft supplies, building blocks and sports equipment. That will put him in a sharing frame of mind when his guest arrives. Ask his friend to bring along a toy or two of his own as well, since your child may be more generous if he’s not the only one doing the giving.

Respect your child’s things
If your preschooler feels that his clothes, books, and toys are being manhandled, it’s unlikely that he’ll give them up even for a moment. So ask permission before you borrow his coloured pencils, and give him the option of saying no. Make sure that siblings, friends and babysitters respect his things too, by asking if they can use them and by taking care of them when they do.

Lead by example
The best way for your three or four year old to learn generosity is to witness it. So share your ice cream with him. Offer him your scarf to fashion into a superhero’s cape, and ask if you can try on his new hat. Use the word share to describe what you’re doing, and don’t forget to teach him that intangibles (like feelings, ideas and stories) can be shared too. Most important, let him see you give and take, compromise and share with others.

The more your child is use to playing with other children the more accustomed they will become to sharing. Enroll your child at Akeba Academy and they will get the opportunity to be around other children and see other children sharing and your child will begin to share as well.  Call us today (912) 289-2725

How to Handle a Clingy Child

Sometimes separation anxiety is triggered by a stressful change in your toddler’s life (such as a new sibling, home, or child-care arrangement). Or it can occur when your toddler (whether by design or by accident) has rarely been outside your care and isn’t used to being around other adults. Hence, the freak-out when it’s time to introduce a sitter into the mix. Sometimes, however, it seems like nothing but elaborate theatrics – the tearful meltdowns every morning at day-care clingy childdrop-off, which (your child’s teacher assures you) are over as soon as the door closes behind you.

Regardless of what’s causing your child’s clinginess, your best bet is to approach her with empathy – and a willingness to brush a few (or a lot) of tears off your shoulder on your way out. Don’t belittle, bribe, or beg; her feelings are valid, even if they are frustrating. When you’re leaving her at child care (or at home with a sitter), help her get busy with an activity she enjoys. Then make your departure short and sweet: A hug and a kiss, a few reassuring words, and a cheerful wave. (It’s never a good idea to sneak off when your toddler is looking the other way. This can backfire fast, since she may quickly conclude that it’s wisest never to let you out of her sight.) Once you’re gone, stay gone – looking back or giving in to her cries will only prolong the agony for both of you. Reassure yourself by checking in with the caregiver later. You’ll most likely learn that the drama of departure has long since dissipated, replaced by utter happiness.

If given the chance to branch out and be a little bit more independent can also help with clinginess. Enroll your child at Akeba Academy, your child will be able to branch out and interact with others and have so much fun that the next time you have to somewhere to go your child wouldn’t mind leaving your side. Give us a call (912) 289-2725

How to Wean Your Child Off the Pacifier

If you have a toddler or even a preschooler holding tight to their binky, you’re not alone: pacifier weaning is a common challenge. While dental problems generally won’t result from pacifier use unless the habit continues beyond age 3, many parents find that pacifier weaning is easier before a child reaches 2 years old. (If you’re concerned, though, check with your pediatric dentist.) For a smooth transition, try these brilliant pacifier-weaning strategies from our readers.

1. Snip the Tip

One of the most popular pacifier-weaning tricks is cutting off the pacifier’s tip. After the ability to suck is removed, many children quickly lose interest. Try telling your child that the pacifier is broken, and let her throw it away. If the initial snip doesn’t do the trick, moms like Christina M., a mother of one son, suggest gradually cutting off more of the pacifier: “I tried cutting the end of the pacifier off a little bit every few days until there was nothing for him to suck on, and then he didn’t really want it anymore.” Just be careful that your child isn’t chewing off pacifier pieces, which could be a choking hazard.

2. Swap Soothing Items

“Try replacing the pacifier with something else that can give her security,” suggests Kate G. While a child may not instantly forget her pacifier, many moms found that alternative soothing items did eventually replace the pacifier. “I replaced the pacifier with a ‘sleep blanket.’ The first couple of nights/naps she woubaby-with-pacifier.jpg3ld cry for about 10 minutes, but her blanket against her face kept her warm and happy eventually,” says Angela C.

3. Gradually Reduce Use

While some moms advocate a cold-turkey approach to pacifier weaning, others like Meredith Z. find that gradually limiting pacifier usage is successful: “First, we limited pacifier usage to inside the house, then only to sleep time, then only to overnight, and then we said ‘let’s try bedtime without your bink just for tonight,’ and after the first night, he only asked for it once, and then he was totally fine. We just made sure we stuck to our rules, and let him be comfortable at each level before restricting bink usage more.”

4. Get Help From the Pacifier Fairy

Another popular pacifier-weaning tactic is to have a make-believe character reward the child for giving away their pacifiers. Sarah M., mother of two girls, shares: “Say that the Dummy Fairy will come and take them and give them to new babies that need them. Then you leave a special ‘big girl’ present in the basket for them when they wake up.” Other moms, including Linnea F., use characters the kids already believe in: “My kids all gave theirs to the Easter Bunny for little ones who need binkies and don’t have them. This would also work with Santa. We still had some withdrawal cries, but it didn’t last.”

5. Trade For Toysbaby-with-pacifier.jpg2

Instead of having imaginative characters bring a child a reward, some moms advocate openly trading the pacifier for a prize. “Take her to Toys ‘R’ Us and let her pick out a toy in exchange for the pacifier,” suggests Janice D. “It worked for me two times. You may have a few days that are a bit rough, but then it will be fine.” Other moms also had their child “pay” the cashier with a pacifier for th

6. “Lose” the Pacifier

After Melissa C. misplaced her daughter’s pacifier, she realized that simply pretending to lose it would be a good pacifier-weaning strategy. “Maybe if you somehow ‘lose’ yours and have him help you look for it and don’t find it, it’ll let him know that you care enough to help him, even if you can’t fix it.” Dawn D. says she used the same weaning tactic. “I just told her we lost it and we’d look, but then she was OK with ‘we lost it’ and in two weeks she forgot all about it.”

7 Tips to Handle Tantrums

1. Don’t lose your cool. A tantrum is not a pretty sight. In addition to kicking, screaming, and pounding the floor, your toddler’s repertoire may include throwing things, hitting, and holding his breath to the point of turning blue. While this may be hard to handle, you can rest assured that even breath holding is normal behavior for a child having a tantrum.kids having tantrums

When your child is swept up in a tantrum, he’s unable to listen to reason, though he will respond – negatively – to your yelling or threatening. “I found the more I shouted at Brandon to stop, the wilder he would get,” says one mother of a 2-year-old. What worked instead, she discovered, was to just sit down and be with him while he raged.

In general, staying with your child during a tantrum is a good idea. Stomping out of the room –alluring as that may be – can make him feel abandoned. The storm of emotion he’s going through can be frightening to him, and he’ll appreciate knowing you’re nearby.

If you find yourself getting overly frustrated, some experts suggest calmly leaving the room for a few minutes and returning after your child has stopped crying. By staying calm, you’ll help him calm down, too.

Some experts recommend picking up your child and holding him if it’s feasible (if he’s not flailing too much, for instance), saying he’ll find your embrace comforting. But others say that tactic rewards negative behavior and that it’s better to ignore the tantrum until your child calms down.

You may find that a judiciously used time-out is a good solution too. Through trial and error, you’ll learn which approach is right for your child. However you choose to handle the tantrum, consistency is key to making it work.

2. Remember that you’re the adult. No matter how long the tantrum continues, don’t give in to unreasonable demands or try to negotiate with your screaming toddler. It’s especially tempting to cave in as a way of ending a public episode. Try not to worry about what others think – anyone who’s a parent has been there before.

By conceding, you’ll only be teaching your child that throwing a fit is a good way to get what she wants, which sets the stage for future conflicts. Besides, your child is already frightened by being out of control. The last thing she needs is to feel that you’re not in control either.

If your child’s outburst escalates to the point that she’s hitting people or pets, throwing things, or screaming nonstop, pick her up and carry her to a safe place, such as her bedroom. Tell her why she’s there (“because you hit Aunt Sally”), and let her know that you’ll stay with her until she can be calm.

If you’re in a public place – a common breeding ground for tantrums – be prepared to leave with your child until she calms down.

“When my daughter was 2, she had an absolute fit at a restaurant because the plain spaghetti she ordered arrived with chopped parsley on it,” recalls one mothekids having tantrums.jpg4r. “Although I realized why she was upset, I wasn’t about to let her disrupt everyone’s dinner. I took her outside until she calmed down.”

3. Use time-outs sparingly. Depending on the child, using a time-out occasionally, beginning at about the age of 18 months, may help him manage his feelings better when he has a tantrum. A time-out can be helpful when your child’s tantrum is especially intense and other techniques aren’t working. Placing your child in a quiet or – better yet – boring spot for a brief period (about one minute per year of his age) can be a good lesson in self-soothing.

Explain what you’re doing (“You’re going to have a time-out so you can calm down and Mommy is going to be right over there”) and let him know it’s not punishment. If he refuses to stay in time-out, simply place him back in the spot firmly but coolly and go about your business. Beyond making sure he’s safe, don’t interact or give him attention during the time-out.

4. Talk it over afterward. When the storm subsides, hold your child close and talk about what happened. Discuss the tantrum in very simple terms and acknowledge your child’s frustration. Help her put her feelings into words by saying something like, “You were very angry because your food wasn’t the way you wanted it.” Let her see that once she expresses himself in words, she’ll get better results. Say with a smile, “I’m sorry I didn’t understand you. Now that you’re not screaming, I can find out what you want.”

5. Let your child know you love him. Once your child is calm and you’ve had a chance to talk to him about his tantrum, give him a quick hug and tell him that you love him. It’s important to reward good behavior, including your child being able to settle down and talk things over with you.

6. Try to head off tantrum-inducing situations. Pay attention to which situations push your child’s buttons and plan accordingly. If she falls apart when she’s hungry, carry snacks with you. If she gets cranky in the late afternoon, take care of errands earlier in the day.

If she has trouble making a transition from one activity to the next, give her a gentle heads-up before a change. Alerting her to the fact that you’re about to leave the playground or sit down to dinner (“We’re going to eat when you and Daddy are done with your story”) gives her a chance to adjust instead of react.

If you sense a tantrum is on the way, try distracting your child by changing locations, giving her a toy, or doing something she doesn’t expect, like making a silly face or pointing at a bird.

Your toddler is becoming more independent, so offer her choices whenever possible. No one likes being told what to do all the time. Saying, “Would you like corn or carrots?” rather than “Eat your corn!” will give her a sense of control.

Monitor how often you’re saying “no.” If you find you’re rattling it off routinely, you’re probably putting unnecessary stress on both of you. Try to ease up and choose your battles.

7. Watch for signs of overstress. Although daily tantrums are a perfectly normal part of the mid-toddler years, it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for possible problems. Has there been upheaval in the family? An extremely busy or harried period? Parental tensions? All of these can provoke tantrums.

If your child’s tantrums seem overly frequent or intense (or he’s hurting himself or others), seek help. Your doctor will discuss your child’s developmental and behavioral milestones with you at routine well-child checkups. These visits are good opportunities to talk about concerns you have about your child’s behavior, and they help to rule out any serious physical or psychological problems. Your doctor can also suggest ways to deal with the outbursts.

Tips For Hand Writing At Home

As your child begins to read and write in kindergarten, you must take an active interest in developing its hand writing. Kindergarten teachers are always pre-occupied with the task of teaching children their alphabets or teaching them how to write proper words. They are also busy with running the school, handling events and other administration work. So you cannot hold them responsible if your child has bad handwriting. A teacher has to handle many kids in one class, so devoting time to each one of them is difficult. If you have a child who has poor hand writing, there is a lot that you can do to help. Check out these few tips to help you get started.

  1. Devote time and be patient:

The one thing you need to give to your child to help them learn and write better is time. You have to be patient with them and show them how to write their letters neatly. You have to explain to them slowly and help them write properly if they make certain mistakes. If you are not patient with them while they learn, they will never be able to write the letters tidily or learn their alphabets properly.

  1. Give regular exercises:

As they say- “practice makes perfect”. So help your children perfect their handwriting by giving them regular writing exercises to do on a daily basis. However, make sure you do not overload them with writing work as the important thing here is to help them improve their hand writing and not make them feel bored and exhausted. Also, help them out when they have difficulties and supervise their work constantly.

  1. Compliment their good work:

Lastly, don’t forget to praise your children when they show signs of improvement in their handwriting. Kids love the appreciation and affection they receive from their parents. So give them a peck on the cheek or a hug whenever they do something right.

Here at Akeba Academy we have the students do plenty of handwriting activities. The picture above is actually one of our students perfecting his handwriting skills. Give us a call today (912) 289-2725

Math Games to Start Your Preschoolers With Early Learning

Using math games is the best way in which you can start off your preschooler with early learning. However, you cannot use conventional methods of teaching your preschooler math. They will not be able to grab hold of the concepts if you are not creative in the way you teach them math. You will first and foremost need to be patient with them and somehow find a way to make math interesting and fun for them. Here are a couple of online math games which will help your preschooler get an early start on their math.

  1. Color by Number:

This is a very creative math game where a certain pattern or shape is given in black and grey on the screen, and a list of colors on the left side. Your child will have to color the picture with the color that matches the number given on the screen. The pictures keep changing as your child finishes a set.math game color by number

  1. Count Money:

This game teaches kids the different values and types of money. Plus, they will even learn how to count in this game as your child will have to learn the total value of money that is given to them on each level. This game promises that your kids will improve their counting skills as well as concentration. They might even learn the value of different kinds of coins with this game.

  1. Learn to Count:

Learn to Count is a very easy counting type of game which is designed for preschoolers. In this game, your child will be shown pictures of some cartoon characters on the screen and will be asked to count the number of those characters that they see.  The game will help them to count better and more accurately.

Enrolling your child at Akeba Academy they will learn to count, master their shapes and colors and much more! We are the only childcare provider with a published curriculum. Call us today (912) 289-2725

How to Prevent a Diaper Rash

You may not always know the reason behind your baby being uncomfortable and we know how mad that makes you. But when you discover little red bumps or see blotchy red skin on your baby’s sweet bottom then you’re bound to freak out a little. But don’t worry; a diaper rash is pretty much part of the baby package. And thankfully there are several ways to prevent diaper rash.

how to prevent diaaper rash 2

We have a few tips to share with you:

  1. Most importantly, you must keep your baby’s skin as clean and dry as possible. This means change the wet and soiled diaper right away. The diaper friction and the wetness make those cheeks more exposed to irritation.
  2. Choose wipes that are gentle, mild and designated to baby’s special needs. Scented wipes and soaps that come in contact with their skin can cause irritation to their nether region. Instead of using wipes, clean the baby’s bottom with a soft washcloth soaked in warm water. Warm water should do the job.
  3. After every change, let her air-dry as much as possible. You can play with your baby while she’s resting on a waterproof pad and let her bottoms get some much needed air-time.
  4. Block that rash with diaper creams and ointments that act as a barrier between the baby soft skin and the irritants. Ointments like old petroleum jelly and those containing zinc-oxide (like Balmex). Apply it thickly yet gently because rubbing and scrubbing will make your baby’s skin more prone to rashes.
  5. A very tight diaper can cause chafing. Loosen-up the diaper without any risk of major leak.

Every baby’s bottom is different, so experiment to see which works best for preventing diaper rash on your little one. Sometimes you may want to experiment different diapers. But you need to remember that replacing the peed-in or pooped-in diaper with a clean, dry one plays the key role in preventing rashes.