Tag Archives: parenting

4 Ways To Save On Childcare

4 Ways to Save On Childcare

Childcare’s are a blessing for working parents, the cost of childcare is about 8% of your paycheck. So, as responsible you’ve got to be prepared for the expense. But, just because you want to opt for a full-time care, doesn’t mean you can’t trim costs. Here are some tips that we recommend from Akeba Academy that will help lower your child care cost:

1. Start early: You must begin your hunt for the right childcare facility early on, for two reasons – best childcare centers stay full or space gets taken early, and you may be lucky to get early bird discounts

 

2. Consider the distance: when looking for a Childcare center, calculate the drive time and gas cost it will take to drop and pick up your child. It may turn out to be that a slightly more expensive childcare located closer to your home may be cost-effective than a cheaper childcare further away. Especially if you work in our downtown Brunswick, Georgia area, choosing Akeba Academy is directly on your path.... downtown brunswick georgia originally settled in 1738 today brunswick

 

3. Look at the base price as well as the benefits: cost is an important factor while searching for childcare, however, it shouldn’t be the only factor. Check out their learning curriculum and the activities that they children perform during the day. Going cheap could cause you to have your child in an “Play all day” “Watch TV all day” environment. Here at Akeba Academy your child will be exposed to our published curriculum that’s designed to help your child to master their early learning skills and build self confidence! We focus on opportunities for children to be Smarter than the average!

4. Tax savings: By simply paying for child care, your family may be able to gain tax benefits. You can either opt for flexible spending accounts with your employer or the Child and Dependent Care Credit on your taxes. Compare the two and see which option is best for your needs. Either service that you choose we can accommodate our parents and provide you with accurate yearly statements.

Paying for child care is definitely one of the “must have” expenses you have to bear as a parent. But, with these steps, it will be possible for you to save big on high-quality childcare for your children.
We would love to work with you! Call our office so that we can create a childcare package to fit your schedule and budget needs, we can be reached at 912-289-2725.

 

How To Help Your Child Overcome Fear

Open

Give children information about their fears. Knowing about things helps to make children less fearful (but not too much detail for young children).

Validate

This means listening to, understanding and not making fun of your child’s fears.

  • Respond to your children’s fear or cries by reassuring your children that they are safe, and cuddling or patting them until they calm down.
  • However, while you show your child that you understand that her fears are real, it is important not to let her think that you are also afraid because it will make her more fearful.

Encourage

Praise and reward your child when he makes a step towards fighting or confronting his fear, eg. getting closer to a dog if he is frightened of dogs.

  • Don’t force your cchild care overcoming fearhild to fully confront his fear, but take it a small step at a time.

Routines

These help children know what to expect and make children feel more secure and confident, eg. bedtime routines can help a child with fear of the dark.

Control

Having some control of the situation often helps with fears.

Opportunities

Provide opportunities for your child to develop skills and gain confidence in her own ability. Confidence can’t be developed on praise alone. It is success and being able to do things that build up a child’s confidence.

  • Let your child try things that she can do, and then give her lots of support and approval.
  • Read children’s stories that deal with fearful events that children overcome.
  • Provide times for fantasy play, dress-ups, drawings, etc., where children can express their fears and take control of them.

Here at Akeba Academy your child gets the opportunity to step out of his or her comfort zone giving them the chance to overcome fears and do things they wouldn’t normally do. Give us a call at (912) 289-2725.

How to Wean Your Child Off the Pacifier

If you have a toddler or even a preschooler holding tight to their binky, you’re not alone: pacifier weaning is a common challenge. While dental problems generally won’t result from pacifier use unless the habit continues beyond age 3, many parents find that pacifier weaning is easier before a child reaches 2 years old. (If you’re concerned, though, check with your pediatric dentist.) For a smooth transition, try these brilliant pacifier-weaning strategies from our readers.

1. Snip the Tip

One of the most popular pacifier-weaning tricks is cutting off the pacifier’s tip. After the ability to suck is removed, many children quickly lose interest. Try telling your child that the pacifier is broken, and let her throw it away. If the initial snip doesn’t do the trick, moms like Christina M., a mother of one son, suggest gradually cutting off more of the pacifier: “I tried cutting the end of the pacifier off a little bit every few days until there was nothing for him to suck on, and then he didn’t really want it anymore.” Just be careful that your child isn’t chewing off pacifier pieces, which could be a choking hazard.

2. Swap Soothing Items

“Try replacing the pacifier with something else that can give her security,” suggests Kate G. While a child may not instantly forget her pacifier, many moms found that alternative soothing items did eventually replace the pacifier. “I replaced the pacifier with a ‘sleep blanket.’ The first couple of nights/naps she woubaby-with-pacifier.jpg3ld cry for about 10 minutes, but her blanket against her face kept her warm and happy eventually,” says Angela C.

3. Gradually Reduce Use

While some moms advocate a cold-turkey approach to pacifier weaning, others like Meredith Z. find that gradually limiting pacifier usage is successful: “First, we limited pacifier usage to inside the house, then only to sleep time, then only to overnight, and then we said ‘let’s try bedtime without your bink just for tonight,’ and after the first night, he only asked for it once, and then he was totally fine. We just made sure we stuck to our rules, and let him be comfortable at each level before restricting bink usage more.”

4. Get Help From the Pacifier Fairy

Another popular pacifier-weaning tactic is to have a make-believe character reward the child for giving away their pacifiers. Sarah M., mother of two girls, shares: “Say that the Dummy Fairy will come and take them and give them to new babies that need them. Then you leave a special ‘big girl’ present in the basket for them when they wake up.” Other moms, including Linnea F., use characters the kids already believe in: “My kids all gave theirs to the Easter Bunny for little ones who need binkies and don’t have them. This would also work with Santa. We still had some withdrawal cries, but it didn’t last.”

5. Trade For Toysbaby-with-pacifier.jpg2

Instead of having imaginative characters bring a child a reward, some moms advocate openly trading the pacifier for a prize. “Take her to Toys ‘R’ Us and let her pick out a toy in exchange for the pacifier,” suggests Janice D. “It worked for me two times. You may have a few days that are a bit rough, but then it will be fine.” Other moms also had their child “pay” the cashier with a pacifier for th

6. “Lose” the Pacifier

After Melissa C. misplaced her daughter’s pacifier, she realized that simply pretending to lose it would be a good pacifier-weaning strategy. “Maybe if you somehow ‘lose’ yours and have him help you look for it and don’t find it, it’ll let him know that you care enough to help him, even if you can’t fix it.” Dawn D. says she used the same weaning tactic. “I just told her we lost it and we’d look, but then she was OK with ‘we lost it’ and in two weeks she forgot all about it.”

7 Tips to Handle Tantrums

1. Don’t lose your cool. A tantrum is not a pretty sight. In addition to kicking, screaming, and pounding the floor, your toddler’s repertoire may include throwing things, hitting, and holding his breath to the point of turning blue. While this may be hard to handle, you can rest assured that even breath holding is normal behavior for a child having a tantrum.kids having tantrums

When your child is swept up in a tantrum, he’s unable to listen to reason, though he will respond – negatively – to your yelling or threatening. “I found the more I shouted at Brandon to stop, the wilder he would get,” says one mother of a 2-year-old. What worked instead, she discovered, was to just sit down and be with him while he raged.

In general, staying with your child during a tantrum is a good idea. Stomping out of the room –alluring as that may be – can make him feel abandoned. The storm of emotion he’s going through can be frightening to him, and he’ll appreciate knowing you’re nearby.

If you find yourself getting overly frustrated, some experts suggest calmly leaving the room for a few minutes and returning after your child has stopped crying. By staying calm, you’ll help him calm down, too.

Some experts recommend picking up your child and holding him if it’s feasible (if he’s not flailing too much, for instance), saying he’ll find your embrace comforting. But others say that tactic rewards negative behavior and that it’s better to ignore the tantrum until your child calms down.

You may find that a judiciously used time-out is a good solution too. Through trial and error, you’ll learn which approach is right for your child. However you choose to handle the tantrum, consistency is key to making it work.

2. Remember that you’re the adult. No matter how long the tantrum continues, don’t give in to unreasonable demands or try to negotiate with your screaming toddler. It’s especially tempting to cave in as a way of ending a public episode. Try not to worry about what others think – anyone who’s a parent has been there before.

By conceding, you’ll only be teaching your child that throwing a fit is a good way to get what she wants, which sets the stage for future conflicts. Besides, your child is already frightened by being out of control. The last thing she needs is to feel that you’re not in control either.

If your child’s outburst escalates to the point that she’s hitting people or pets, throwing things, or screaming nonstop, pick her up and carry her to a safe place, such as her bedroom. Tell her why she’s there (“because you hit Aunt Sally”), and let her know that you’ll stay with her until she can be calm.

If you’re in a public place – a common breeding ground for tantrums – be prepared to leave with your child until she calms down.

“When my daughter was 2, she had an absolute fit at a restaurant because the plain spaghetti she ordered arrived with chopped parsley on it,” recalls one mothekids having tantrums.jpg4r. “Although I realized why she was upset, I wasn’t about to let her disrupt everyone’s dinner. I took her outside until she calmed down.”

3. Use time-outs sparingly. Depending on the child, using a time-out occasionally, beginning at about the age of 18 months, may help him manage his feelings better when he has a tantrum. A time-out can be helpful when your child’s tantrum is especially intense and other techniques aren’t working. Placing your child in a quiet or – better yet – boring spot for a brief period (about one minute per year of his age) can be a good lesson in self-soothing.

Explain what you’re doing (“You’re going to have a time-out so you can calm down and Mommy is going to be right over there”) and let him know it’s not punishment. If he refuses to stay in time-out, simply place him back in the spot firmly but coolly and go about your business. Beyond making sure he’s safe, don’t interact or give him attention during the time-out.

4. Talk it over afterward. When the storm subsides, hold your child close and talk about what happened. Discuss the tantrum in very simple terms and acknowledge your child’s frustration. Help her put her feelings into words by saying something like, “You were very angry because your food wasn’t the way you wanted it.” Let her see that once she expresses himself in words, she’ll get better results. Say with a smile, “I’m sorry I didn’t understand you. Now that you’re not screaming, I can find out what you want.”

5. Let your child know you love him. Once your child is calm and you’ve had a chance to talk to him about his tantrum, give him a quick hug and tell him that you love him. It’s important to reward good behavior, including your child being able to settle down and talk things over with you.

6. Try to head off tantrum-inducing situations. Pay attention to which situations push your child’s buttons and plan accordingly. If she falls apart when she’s hungry, carry snacks with you. If she gets cranky in the late afternoon, take care of errands earlier in the day.

If she has trouble making a transition from one activity to the next, give her a gentle heads-up before a change. Alerting her to the fact that you’re about to leave the playground or sit down to dinner (“We’re going to eat when you and Daddy are done with your story”) gives her a chance to adjust instead of react.

If you sense a tantrum is on the way, try distracting your child by changing locations, giving her a toy, or doing something she doesn’t expect, like making a silly face or pointing at a bird.

Your toddler is becoming more independent, so offer her choices whenever possible. No one likes being told what to do all the time. Saying, “Would you like corn or carrots?” rather than “Eat your corn!” will give her a sense of control.

Monitor how often you’re saying “no.” If you find you’re rattling it off routinely, you’re probably putting unnecessary stress on both of you. Try to ease up and choose your battles.

7. Watch for signs of overstress. Although daily tantrums are a perfectly normal part of the mid-toddler years, it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for possible problems. Has there been upheaval in the family? An extremely busy or harried period? Parental tensions? All of these can provoke tantrums.

If your child’s tantrums seem overly frequent or intense (or he’s hurting himself or others), seek help. Your doctor will discuss your child’s developmental and behavioral milestones with you at routine well-child checkups. These visits are good opportunities to talk about concerns you have about your child’s behavior, and they help to rule out any serious physical or psychological problems. Your doctor can also suggest ways to deal with the outbursts.