Tag Archives: Reading

Everyday Ways To Support Your Toddler’s Learning And Development

  • Encourage fine motor development.Provide your toddler with fat crayons or non-toxic, washable markers, and let him scribble on paper. This will get him interested in and give him practice drawing, coloring, and writing.
  • Spend time outside.Your toddler will want to run and climb, and the outdoors is a great place for her to do this. Help her climb and play on an age appropriate playground structure. You can also engage your child outdoors by playing with a ball, or introducing her to a bicycle or riding toy that is safe and appropriate for her age and size.
  • Use rhythm and rhyme.A great way to stimulate your toddler’s language development is with rhythmic rhymes. Sit with him on your knees facing you and recite simple rhymes. Don’t worry, if you don’t know any, you can make them up as you go along! You can also listen to music and hold his hands and dance.
  • Toys and games.At this age, there are many things your toddler can play with. She will like blocks and toys that can be stacked. She may also like push, pull, and riding toys, such as a miniature stroller or cars and trains. You can also engage her with simple puzzles. She may also like to ‘help’ you with what you are doing; for example, if you are cooking, give her some pots and pans to play with.
  • Read to your child.Reading to your child is one of the best gifts you can give him. Pick simple sturdy books with bright pictures and let him help turn the pages while you read the words on each page. Wordless books are also great at this age, and you can make up your own storyIMG_20150618_110012592

At Akeba Academy our lesson plans are always filled with activities such as the ones listed above. The picture in this blog is our class working on their fine motor skills. When it comes to learning and development we don’t stop until your child reaches their goal!

Call us at (912) 289-2725

5 Board Games That Can Improve Reading Skills

Family game nights are a great way to spend time together, but what about adding a little bit extra to the mix?

What if we, as parents, made a teensy-tiny more of an effort to sneak in some learning along the way?  We can add in little number recognition practice by playing bingo, or work on quick addition skills with dice games.  We can help kids practice some critical thinking by doing family brain teasers or even strategy with simple card games like Rummy, Uno, or Spades.

The cool thing is that many of the board games we played as children can do more for our kids than just be fun ways of passing time together.

Try sneaking in some reading with these 5 board games:

Majority Rules:  this game gives players a chance to see Democracy in action! Reading, voting, and writing, imaginations run wild with this game.

Life: There’s a whole lot of chance in this classic board game, but there’s also a whole lot of reading.

Monopoly: Yes, you may need to set aside a good chunk of time to play this favorite board game, but who cares because your kids will be reading more than you think!

Apples to Apples: A super-fun family game that will get players thinking and laughing and stretching their minds, since every single card requires reading.  It’s all about comparing with this game, friends. Apples to apples.

Scrambled States of America: One of our all-time favorite games to play. You’ll never look at our nation’s states, capitals, or nicknames quite the same.

At Akeba Academy we play learning games with the children all the time. It motivates them to learn while they’re having a good time as well.

Benefits Of Reading To Your Toddler

Reading to your toddler

When to expect it: Receptive language (the understanding that words have meaning) develops on a different timeline than expressive language (the ability to say words with meaning) — and your child is likely to understand words in books long before he can say most of them. Between 12 and 18 months of age, many toddlers demonstrate their growing word comprehension by pointing to the colors, animals, characters and objects in a book that they know the words for. Because many toddlers are also continuing to develop fine motor skills at this time, your toddler may particularly love books that have interactive elements, such as flaps, popups and buttons.

Read to your toddler often — it’s so important for many reasons. Toddlers are:

  • Little word processors. This is the age when children’s vocabularies blossimage1om. Reading reinforces their understanding of the new words they’re learning and the contexts they’re used in —
  • Ready to build their literary skills. Reading to a toddler sets the foundation for toddler learning, including mastering ABCs, developing phonemic awareness (meaning he’s starting to understand that words are made up of groups of sounds) and learning that those marks on a page represent letters and words (and things and concepts).
  • Better prepared for school with books. Although “real” school may seem light-years away, it’s just around the corner (and most kids are expected to start reading, at least on a rudimentary level, in kindergarten). Children who are introduced to reading early tend to read earlier themselves.
  • Apt to benefit from books about growing up. The road from babyhood to big kid can be bumpy between 1 to 3 or so not to mention the potential frustrations and fears he may encounter. Reading to a toddler can help you cover these subjects in ways your child can understand, as well as help him adjust to the brave new world he faces.

How to help your baby discover it: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends reading sessions from infancy on to prepare your child for lifelong success, since kids who are read to as babies have better language skills and are more interested in reading when they start school. Sharing a book also helps babies and parents bond, which the AAP notes is essential for a child’s cognitive and social-emotional development. So from an early age, read often to your little one, pointing out objects, characters, animals, colors, textures and sizes in the pictures he sees.

We know how important reading is and how much of an impact it has on the lives of young children. That’s why here at Akeba Academy our teachers read to the students every day. The pictures above are our Toddler One and Preschool class having story time.