Tag Archives: toddlers

Dangers of kids and cars during the winter

The average puffy coat or snowsuit usually adds about 4 inches of slack into the child’s harness straps. Those extra 4 inches significantly increases the risk of injury and particularly head injury. If there is every a place to cross your Ts and dot your I’s, your child’s car seat is certainly the place. It can literally save your child’s life.

The fluff from your child’s jacket can make it seem like their straps on the car seat are snug but in all reality they are actually loose putting your child’s life in danger. A way that you can test whether or not the straps are tight enough is, if you have room for more than one finger at your child’s collar bone than the straps are too loose. The straps aren’t actually holding in your child’s body.

It is important to secure your child with the cars seat straps because, in an accident the child’s body will come to a jolting stop allowing the child to move forward. That increases the child’s risk of hitting their head on windows, or doors, or seats in front of them.

To still keep your child warm without the big fluffy coat try layering their clothing. Below is a picture for the correct way to strap your child in.

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Akeba Academy always puts the safety of the child first, If your looking for a childcare provider who values what you value give us a call today (912) 289-2734

Christmas is a time for family to get together, to give thanks, and to be grateful for everything that has been supplied to them throughout the year. Sometimes one may get the feeling that Christmas is only about Santa, giving of gifts, and making the children happy during this one day of the year.

Here at Akeba Academy we believe in all of those things as well, but we also believe that everyone in the family has a major part to play in the success and in the idea of having family time together. In today’s blog, we want to talk to you about how to include your infants and toddlers in your Christmas time together. We believe that the little ones are the most important and it is a great time for them to understand the reason for the season. Infants and toddlers can participate with their own arts and crafts, created by them for family members as well as friends and family who participate in your Christmas time.

At Akeba Academy our infant room offers infants six-weeks to twelve-months of age an opportunity to have one-on-one time with their teacher where they can create sensory arts and craft activities. They can be used as ornaments or even given as a gift inside of a picture frame. As you can remember when we were younger, our parents would take our baby shoes and dip them in copper and make plaques from our baby shoes. Those things are old-school but they were some of the most memorable gifts that you could ever give a parent or grandparent.

We believe that as the children get older the arts and crafts from their younger years is really what matters during this time of the year. Our infant program provides a small teacher-to-child ratio, loads of hands-on activities, lots of independence and love, and a large space for small explorers to move around and to become more independent each and every day. At Akeba Academy our infants are creating arts and crafts activities that can be used for years to come for grandparents, aunts, and uncles, as a memory.

If you’re looking for a childcare provider that values what you value, give us a call today by contacting us at 912-289-2725. We would love for you to visit our infant room and to allow your little one to become a part of our family today.IMG_0291

Benefits Of Early Learning

Abundance of benefit of early childhood education will help children. Early childhood education is important and it is not an option. Meaning as parents we should understand that early childhood education is very important so that there is no other consideration whether children really need it or not. Early childhood education play very important role in helping a good development for children. Early childhood education is the fundamental that teach children ”learning while playing”. Recent studies shows in the early years of child’s life (some said the first eight years) is the stage where the brain and the brain cells ”connect ”. A good early childhood education will help the child’s brain grows optimally and also on the other hand a bad early childhood education will influence the child’s brain development in the other way. Early childhood curriculum is not only focused on preparing children intellectually and academically to enter primary education. More than that to enter primary education also requires other aspects to support their readiness in primary education, such as how to socialize, emotional maturity , and a  good sensory motor skills as well.12366573_1212516315432284_1299716862_n

That’s why Akeba Acadmey is offering a FREE WEEK of childcare to your family and friends. Refer us to a friend and give the gift of learning. Hurry the offer ends soon. Give us a call at 912-289-2725

4 Ways To Save On Childcare

4 Ways to Save On Childcare

Childcare’s are a blessing for working parents, the cost of childcare is about 8% of your paycheck. So, as responsible you’ve got to be prepared for the expense. But, just because you want to opt for a full-time care, doesn’t mean you can’t trim costs. Here are some tips that we recommend from Akeba Academy that will help lower your child care cost:

1. Start early: You must begin your hunt for the right childcare facility early on, for two reasons – best childcare centers stay full or space gets taken early, and you may be lucky to get early bird discounts

 

2. Consider the distance: when looking for a Childcare center, calculate the drive time and gas cost it will take to drop and pick up your child. It may turn out to be that a slightly more expensive childcare located closer to your home may be cost-effective than a cheaper childcare further away. Especially if you work in our downtown Brunswick, Georgia area, choosing Akeba Academy is directly on your path.... downtown brunswick georgia originally settled in 1738 today brunswick

 

3. Look at the base price as well as the benefits: cost is an important factor while searching for childcare, however, it shouldn’t be the only factor. Check out their learning curriculum and the activities that they children perform during the day. Going cheap could cause you to have your child in an “Play all day” “Watch TV all day” environment. Here at Akeba Academy your child will be exposed to our published curriculum that’s designed to help your child to master their early learning skills and build self confidence! We focus on opportunities for children to be Smarter than the average!

4. Tax savings: By simply paying for child care, your family may be able to gain tax benefits. You can either opt for flexible spending accounts with your employer or the Child and Dependent Care Credit on your taxes. Compare the two and see which option is best for your needs. Either service that you choose we can accommodate our parents and provide you with accurate yearly statements.

Paying for child care is definitely one of the “must have” expenses you have to bear as a parent. But, with these steps, it will be possible for you to save big on high-quality childcare for your children.
We would love to work with you! Call our office so that we can create a childcare package to fit your schedule and budget needs, we can be reached at 912-289-2725.

 

Preparing For Preschool

Starting preschool is one of the many exciting milestones of childhood. However, it can also be a stressful time for both children and parents, especially if it is your child’s first time going to school. By taking some time to prepare your child and yourself, the transition can go smoothly for your whole family.

Keep your child informed. It is natural for your child to be nervous about going to preschool. Talk to your child about preschool and what he will do there. Try to keep these conversations casual so your child does not feel intimidated or overwhelmed.

Use books to prepare. Include some children’s books about the first day of school along with the other books you and your child read together. This will give your child the opportunity to ask questions and express any fears she may have. You can ask her new teachers or the librarian at your public library for recommendations.

Get into a routine. Start to adjust your child’s sleeping and eating schedules slowly in the weeks leading up to the first day of preschool. This will help smooth the transition and make him more comfortable when school finally starts and you have to be out the door at a certain time.

Go for a visit. Find out if your child’s preschool has a visiting day or orientation for new families. This is an opportunity for you to talk with the teachers and have your questions answered. Your child will also have a chance to meet his teachers, other students, and experience the preschool with you present.

Meet other preschoolers. If possible, organize a play date or two with children who will be in your child’s preschool class. This way not every face in the classroom will be unfamiliar when your child enters her classroom on the first day, and you can find other parents to share experiences with.

Give it time. Leave plenty of time on the first day to arrive at school and be prepared to spend some time in the classroom with your child. Some preschools even request that parents stay in the classroom for all or part of the first day of school. Anticipate some ups and downs the first few weeks of school as your child gets settled, but know that soon your whole family will be adjusted to your new routine.

Here at Akeba Academy we can help prepare your child for preschool with our learning made easy curriculum. We are actually enrolling kids now to be apart of our preschool program. Give us a call today (9120 289 – 2725kids learning outside

5 Board Games That Can Improve Reading Skills

Family game nights are a great way to spend time together, but what about adding a little bit extra to the mix?

What if we, as parents, made a teensy-tiny more of an effort to sneak in some learning along the way?  We can add in little number recognition practice by playing bingo, or work on quick addition skills with dice games.  We can help kids practice some critical thinking by doing family brain teasers or even strategy with simple card games like Rummy, Uno, or Spades.

The cool thing is that many of the board games we played as children can do more for our kids than just be fun ways of passing time together.

Try sneaking in some reading with these 5 board games:

Majority Rules:  this game gives players a chance to see Democracy in action! Reading, voting, and writing, imaginations run wild with this game.

Life: There’s a whole lot of chance in this classic board game, but there’s also a whole lot of reading.

Monopoly: Yes, you may need to set aside a good chunk of time to play this favorite board game, but who cares because your kids will be reading more than you think!

Apples to Apples: A super-fun family game that will get players thinking and laughing and stretching their minds, since every single card requires reading.  It’s all about comparing with this game, friends. Apples to apples.

Scrambled States of America: One of our all-time favorite games to play. You’ll never look at our nation’s states, capitals, or nicknames quite the same.

At Akeba Academy we play learning games with the children all the time. It motivates them to learn while they’re having a good time as well.

Tidy Up The House In 10 Minutes

Pop the little kids’ favorite DVD into the player and give them a small no-mess snack so they’re occupied—this way, they won’t undo your work as you go. Meanwhile, you, your partner and big kids can zip around the house.

 Give yourself three minutes for a sweep through the rooms. Grab a bin or basket or two and pick up everything that doesn’t belong: dirty laundry, excess shoes, toys, models of the Eiffel Tower. In the family room, stash books and magazines  into an ottoman or a drawer in your coffee table, if you have one. In the kitchen, the big kids can clear the counter and load the dishwasher. Don’t worry about sorting things nicely—that’s for another time.

 Finish picking up in the bathroom and, while you’re there, take three minutes: Flush the toilet, close lid, close the shower curtain, wipe counters and replace towels. The key to a quick bathroom turnaround is a little prep. Pack a set of clean coordinated towels and washcloths in a zippered bag (the kind comforters come in). Include kitchen and dining room linens, if you like. When company drops by, you won’t have to scrounge in the linen closet. After they leave, do the laundry and pack the set back up, ready for the next visitors.

 On to the kitchen! You and your helpers have three minutes to wipe the table and counters, put out the garbage, clean under the table with something like a Swiffer WetJet (especially if your children are small and floors are sticky).House_Cleaning_Home

A minute left! Enough time to comb your hair. And take a big breath.

If you need some time to just relax, bring your kids to Akeba Academy, we’ll keep them occupied for you. We understand how busy you parents are. Feel free to give us a call (912)289-2725

Importance of Preschool

The majority of kids attend at least one year of preschool. Children who attend preschool enter kindergarten with better skills, and stronger basic math skills than those who do not go to preschool. Also to above skills children can learn to be respectful of others and also build confidence. Preschool provide a better way of teaching. Rather than sit kids down and ‘teach’ them, children learn best through doing the kinds of activities they like.

It supports that early education is key to long-term achievement. Many working parents could benefit from childcare. There is a growing belief that children gain a lot of knowledge from going to preschool. At preschool, children are exposed to information, numbers, letters, and shape. More important children learn how to interact with people — get along with other children and share.

Is FREE Childcare Better Than Private Childpreschoolcare?

Free Childcare:

The Government appreciates that the requirements of the children and the parents may change from time to time. For this purpose, the Government encourages flexibility on the part of the service provider.

Effective changes in the later educational outcomes of three-year-olds saw large increases in free early education. Changes are sighted making childcare easier. Children from a poor upbringing tend to have inferior language skills when they arrive at school.

Benefits of Free Childcare:

  • Free Childcare Center function in a variety of places including offices, community centers, schools and places of worship.
  • Free child care benefits disadvantaged children to improve their skills and show their abilities.
  • It can help your child to socialize with other children

But free childcare policy has no educational benefits in the longer term. It might be because the private pre-school places were high enough quality. Free childcare offer less personal one-to-one care

Private Childcare:

Child care is the supervision of a child or children. Private Childcare can run out of centers or private homes.Circle Time

Benefits of private childcare:

  • Private childcare is licensed private-home day care. These type of childcare Centers are Government- regulated and inspected.
  • Children of the same family can place together.
  • The caretaker has to assure safety and security of the child.
  • The caretaker has to meet standards of care.

But then again private childcare is expensive. Also, it works to fixed times with no flexibility if you need to work late or drop off early.

Here at Akeba Academy your kids will be safe and secure, they also will get attention and learn new things. We have a potty training system. We work hard to improve their math and reading skills. One of the pictures above is an actual picture from Akeba where our teachers are reading to the students. If interested please feel free to give us a call. (912) 289-2725

Teaching Your Child To Share

Make sharing fun
Teach your child cooperative games in which players work together toward a common goal. Do puzzles together, taking turns adding pieces, for instance. Share projects, too: water the plants, sweep the floor, or unpack the shopping with him. Finally, give him things to share with his friends now and then, like a special snack for nursery or a roll of stickers to divvy up during playtime.

Don’t punish stinginess
If you tell your child that he’s selfish, discipline him when he doesn’t share, or force him to hand over a prized possession, you’ll foster resentment, not generosity. To encourage sharing, use positive reinforcement rather than admonishment. Keep in mind, too, that it’s OK for your child to hold back certain items. As he matures, he’ll learn that sharing with friends – who are becoming increasingly important to him – is more fun than keeping things to himself.

Talk it up
When children squabble over toys, help them work out what’s really going on. If a friend is holding something back, explain to your child how his playmate might be feeling. For instance: “Josh really likes that toy, and he doesn’t want anyone to play with it right now.” Help your preschooler put his own feelings into words too. When he’s not being especially generous, ask him what’s wrong. Maybe you’ll discover that there’s a shortage of train tracks at his nursery or that he especially prizes his football cards because they were a present from Grandad.

Teach your youngster to problem-solve
If your child has a death grip on a toy truck that his playmate wants, chances are he’s thinking, “It’s either him or me.” The concept of sharing the truck may not even have occurred to him. Encourage your child to take turns with the truck (setting a kitchen timer to mark each child’s turn may help), reassure him that sharing isn’t the same as giving away, and point out that if he shares his toys with friends, they’ll be more inclined to share theirs with him.

Set the stage Two children are playing on the floor
Before playtime, ask your child if there’s anything he’d rather not share, and help him find a good place to keep those special toys. Then ask him to think of some things that would be fun for him and his visitor to play with together, such as toy walkie-talkies, art and craft supplies, building blocks and sports equipment. That will put him in a sharing frame of mind when his guest arrives. Ask his friend to bring along a toy or two of his own as well, since your child may be more generous if he’s not the only one doing the giving.

Respect your child’s things
If your preschooler feels that his clothes, books, and toys are being manhandled, it’s unlikely that he’ll give them up even for a moment. So ask permission before you borrow his coloured pencils, and give him the option of saying no. Make sure that siblings, friends and babysitters respect his things too, by asking if they can use them and by taking care of them when they do.

Lead by example
The best way for your three or four year old to learn generosity is to witness it. So share your ice cream with him. Offer him your scarf to fashion into a superhero’s cape, and ask if you can try on his new hat. Use the word share to describe what you’re doing, and don’t forget to teach him that intangibles (like feelings, ideas and stories) can be shared too. Most important, let him see you give and take, compromise and share with others.

The more your child is use to playing with other children the more accustomed they will become to sharing. Enroll your child at Akeba Academy and they will get the opportunity to be around other children and see other children sharing and your child will begin to share as well.  Call us today (912) 289-2725

7 Tips to Handle Tantrums

1. Don’t lose your cool. A tantrum is not a pretty sight. In addition to kicking, screaming, and pounding the floor, your toddler’s repertoire may include throwing things, hitting, and holding his breath to the point of turning blue. While this may be hard to handle, you can rest assured that even breath holding is normal behavior for a child having a tantrum.kids having tantrums

When your child is swept up in a tantrum, he’s unable to listen to reason, though he will respond – negatively – to your yelling or threatening. “I found the more I shouted at Brandon to stop, the wilder he would get,” says one mother of a 2-year-old. What worked instead, she discovered, was to just sit down and be with him while he raged.

In general, staying with your child during a tantrum is a good idea. Stomping out of the room –alluring as that may be – can make him feel abandoned. The storm of emotion he’s going through can be frightening to him, and he’ll appreciate knowing you’re nearby.

If you find yourself getting overly frustrated, some experts suggest calmly leaving the room for a few minutes and returning after your child has stopped crying. By staying calm, you’ll help him calm down, too.

Some experts recommend picking up your child and holding him if it’s feasible (if he’s not flailing too much, for instance), saying he’ll find your embrace comforting. But others say that tactic rewards negative behavior and that it’s better to ignore the tantrum until your child calms down.

You may find that a judiciously used time-out is a good solution too. Through trial and error, you’ll learn which approach is right for your child. However you choose to handle the tantrum, consistency is key to making it work.

2. Remember that you’re the adult. No matter how long the tantrum continues, don’t give in to unreasonable demands or try to negotiate with your screaming toddler. It’s especially tempting to cave in as a way of ending a public episode. Try not to worry about what others think – anyone who’s a parent has been there before.

By conceding, you’ll only be teaching your child that throwing a fit is a good way to get what she wants, which sets the stage for future conflicts. Besides, your child is already frightened by being out of control. The last thing she needs is to feel that you’re not in control either.

If your child’s outburst escalates to the point that she’s hitting people or pets, throwing things, or screaming nonstop, pick her up and carry her to a safe place, such as her bedroom. Tell her why she’s there (“because you hit Aunt Sally”), and let her know that you’ll stay with her until she can be calm.

If you’re in a public place – a common breeding ground for tantrums – be prepared to leave with your child until she calms down.

“When my daughter was 2, she had an absolute fit at a restaurant because the plain spaghetti she ordered arrived with chopped parsley on it,” recalls one mothekids having tantrums.jpg4r. “Although I realized why she was upset, I wasn’t about to let her disrupt everyone’s dinner. I took her outside until she calmed down.”

3. Use time-outs sparingly. Depending on the child, using a time-out occasionally, beginning at about the age of 18 months, may help him manage his feelings better when he has a tantrum. A time-out can be helpful when your child’s tantrum is especially intense and other techniques aren’t working. Placing your child in a quiet or – better yet – boring spot for a brief period (about one minute per year of his age) can be a good lesson in self-soothing.

Explain what you’re doing (“You’re going to have a time-out so you can calm down and Mommy is going to be right over there”) and let him know it’s not punishment. If he refuses to stay in time-out, simply place him back in the spot firmly but coolly and go about your business. Beyond making sure he’s safe, don’t interact or give him attention during the time-out.

4. Talk it over afterward. When the storm subsides, hold your child close and talk about what happened. Discuss the tantrum in very simple terms and acknowledge your child’s frustration. Help her put her feelings into words by saying something like, “You were very angry because your food wasn’t the way you wanted it.” Let her see that once she expresses himself in words, she’ll get better results. Say with a smile, “I’m sorry I didn’t understand you. Now that you’re not screaming, I can find out what you want.”

5. Let your child know you love him. Once your child is calm and you’ve had a chance to talk to him about his tantrum, give him a quick hug and tell him that you love him. It’s important to reward good behavior, including your child being able to settle down and talk things over with you.

6. Try to head off tantrum-inducing situations. Pay attention to which situations push your child’s buttons and plan accordingly. If she falls apart when she’s hungry, carry snacks with you. If she gets cranky in the late afternoon, take care of errands earlier in the day.

If she has trouble making a transition from one activity to the next, give her a gentle heads-up before a change. Alerting her to the fact that you’re about to leave the playground or sit down to dinner (“We’re going to eat when you and Daddy are done with your story”) gives her a chance to adjust instead of react.

If you sense a tantrum is on the way, try distracting your child by changing locations, giving her a toy, or doing something she doesn’t expect, like making a silly face or pointing at a bird.

Your toddler is becoming more independent, so offer her choices whenever possible. No one likes being told what to do all the time. Saying, “Would you like corn or carrots?” rather than “Eat your corn!” will give her a sense of control.

Monitor how often you’re saying “no.” If you find you’re rattling it off routinely, you’re probably putting unnecessary stress on both of you. Try to ease up and choose your battles.

7. Watch for signs of overstress. Although daily tantrums are a perfectly normal part of the mid-toddler years, it’s a good idea to keep an eye out for possible problems. Has there been upheaval in the family? An extremely busy or harried period? Parental tensions? All of these can provoke tantrums.

If your child’s tantrums seem overly frequent or intense (or he’s hurting himself or others), seek help. Your doctor will discuss your child’s developmental and behavioral milestones with you at routine well-child checkups. These visits are good opportunities to talk about concerns you have about your child’s behavior, and they help to rule out any serious physical or psychological problems. Your doctor can also suggest ways to deal with the outbursts.